29 Comments

Totally agree with the idea that we have to knock the legs out of this whole platform. Based on published studies, Geoff Pain has argued two things:

1) that the endotoxin contamination in commercial scale production is not something they can clean up entirely, even if they might be able to improve it.

And 2) even femtoscale contamination with endotoxin can be deadly because of the self-amplifying cytokine cascades that endotoxin induces.

So that could be another angle of attack on the mRNA platform.

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Jun 5, 2023Liked by Anandamide

Nicely put Anadamide. Politically Corrupt Readout = nail on the head.

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👏👏👏👏👏Excellent piece and nice to see you back in the saddle again!! Given the subject matter, I expect we will be see a lot more of your work in the coming months. 🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️ I get the feeling that this whole SNAFU is all to cover up the original SV40 SNAFU! 🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️🤦‍♀️

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Jun 5, 2023Liked by Anandamide

So good and so informative to see you two dangerously qualified heretics together in a discussion.

Here's hoping the pilots of the black helicopter fleet will all have been grounded due to compliance with the un-authorizable EUA injections.

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This information is very important to me as I attempt to model and predict the contamination issues associated with donated blood. I postulate that there are multiple contaminates that vary in half life and initial density. I have found no reliable study on this important issue. See my substack for a scientist's notebook on the topic and I would appreciate any help. I have a kinda medical background but my specialty is in semiconductor technology design and manufacturing and AI R&D. I do have a PhD major in Biophysics, so I am literate and can add value to the discussion.

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Jun 5, 2023Liked by Anandamide

Anandamide, is this study relevant to the contaminants?

https://elifesciences.org/articles/74974

also, this new study?

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022354923000096

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author

That is an interesting first paper regarding splicing.

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author

The Patel paper doesn't account for TENT enzymes that can re-adenylate truncated transcripts in the cell.

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and the implications?

Another thing. What in the vaccine ... do you think .... is nuking Hematopoietic stem pregenitor cells in the cord blood of babies of mRNA vaccinated mothers?

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/36406860/

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Thank you , thank you, thank you.

I want to be able to translate this for my legislators. I had a quiet conversation with a primary care Family Practice type at my annual physical.

The primary care group is a subset of a top-tier hospital with branches in midwest, west and east.

I was concerned about some few-minute night-time arrhythmias that were waking me up--after my fourth injection. I had been preoccupied with my spouse's three and a half year cascade of health issues unrelated to the vaccine. Dad was a GP, but died in 1989 or I think he would have alerted me ot the COVID/vaccine discussion. (He was that kind of doc.)

My primary care provider was open to hearing what I had to say because a 22-year old and another doc he knew had died suddenly recently (with no clue why).

I sent him some information--on how to look up his dose risk, the Danish study that conceptualized risk in terms of low-moderate-high risk and why that might have been, FLCC protocol to look at to try and keep himself operating, and some graphics of the structure of the vaccines. I sent a link to a video of Dr. Fleming's account of the grants and patents chain behind GOF, and a link to Dr. Burhardt's first video showing his pathology slides.

I can do the same for my legislators and maybe that will begin to open ears and get conversations going.

But to translate why they need to be concerned about transgenesis I guess I will need to have a couple of textbooks minimum to get me up to speed even with the video linked above and a helpful translation of this current newsletter from Dr. Rose (hoping for that, anyway).

I did some reading in genetics of sheep re potential ancestor breeds of our local Florida Cracker heritage breed (I think some of it came from Minorca where Turnbull launched his fleet for New Smyrna on the east Florida coast and that whole Balearic set of sheep seems to be a favorite blind spot of sheep breed genetic researchers), but this is COVID vaccine situation so far in the weeds of microgenetics it is comical (in terms of MY ability to advocate for stopping vaccination and for not basing our economic recovery on pharma profits from MRNA shots for swine and cows)!

If someone commenting here can give me a couple of references that I (and legislators) can use to get up to terminological and conceptual speed I would sure appreciate it. Or some buzzwords to use in searching Google Scholar (if they didn't wreck that with AI).

I feel like I did back in 1996 when my twins' teachers thought kindergarteners and first graders could not use a computer mouse with Apple software to drag down letters to spell their names. The teachers didn't even know how to do that.

Only in this case the 'literacy' gap is more like the Grand Canyon. Argh.

But still, I'll keep trying to understand, and thank you, thank you , thank you all.

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Jun 5, 2023·edited Jun 6, 2023Liked by Anandamide

my two cents, when this vaccination started quite a few scientists and doctors went to congress with facts to stop the vaccination ...

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But as with Tess Lawrie and her letters to all her legislators, I think my legislators need to hear from constituents, with good references. (They may have been briefed, or may have arranged to get saline, but I want to patiently present good references at a level a layperson would understand. With a record of the transmission. Then keep updating the summary and references as things become clear. Does that seem like a logical strategy or is there a better way? Do you think/know legislators are continually briefed? They have a lot of issues on their plate at present, competing for priority. Must be the busiest session in a long time :-}.

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I am always curious when vaxxed people start to read substacks, because i don't even discuss my reads on substack regarding this tremendous scam with scientific facts and links to it nor asking the right questions with anyone that took the jab, because they don't want to. There is absolutely no interest, my experience. Just curious. So, if you started reading earlier on, would it change your opinion on taking more vaccines. I don't mean to sound nosy, i am just seriously curious. It is almost a parallel world we live in for the last 3 years now.

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Hmm. “They don’t want to.” I can usually tell and I just don’t spend the energy unless I think there’s a human under the word-shell that might talk a bit. Sometime there’s no response, but I try to just ask honest questions. Like when people tell me ‘thank you for your service’ —I say ‘thanks for being worth serving.’ Trying to make people think.

“Three years…” I wasn’t entrenched before or during. I didn’t start reading here much before I started commenting. I had been off social media for years. I came back when Twitter was said to be opened up by Elon’s purchase. Elon’s extremely tough, but I have an SV tech entrepreneur as a son-in-law and that gives me some perspective on how challenging Elon’s move was. I came back in to Twitter to support however I could. (Not much, LOL.) That led me here in March or so.

“If you started reading earlier on, would it change your opinion on taking more vaccines[?]” The facts presented would change not my ‘opinion’ but would change whether I used vaccines. Kevin’s remarks about the vaccine structure were some of the first fact-like things that came up about the COVID vaccines for me, referred to by a video interview with Jessica Rose. Kevin doesn’t have time to translate everything to lay language. Jessica’s a bit better 🙂. Kevin’s technical lingo is beyond me, but I get the gist. Kevin was/is relating his weird experience, speaking his truth, asking for collegial commentary. The vaccine makers were not talking. Reminded me of what little dad said about the pros and cons of smoking cigarettes way back in the 60’s and 70’s.

Front line docs see things and do their best to support ‘who people are’ and keep them well, but most don’t have the technical know-how, gear, and community—and time—to do hard science. Docs used to depend on researchers. But I saw paperwork and bureaucracy just about swamp dad. Not a lot of time for thoughtfully reading research.

He eventually fought back by ‘specializing’ in emergency medicine, but that lasted about the year it took him to re-rack his practice before he died suddenly (cardiac tamponade—ascending dissecting aortic aneurysm—and by the way my undertaker ex-father-in-law thinks that’s a more common cause of death (pre-COVID) than understood because some times he had to pump in a s*t ton more embalming fluid than usual for the garden variety heart attack that might be on the death certificate—we didn’t have a good baseline then and that muddies the picture now). There’s a lot more to the bureaucratic and political swamping, but maybe it helps explain me. There’s a lot that’s not just what Kevin is looking into in the way of understanding the basic risk to you yourself versus some particular vaccine. He alludes to one aspect of that with his version of PCR. There are many other variables.

I follow some from my old profession on Twitter, but also an Irish researcher who surfaces interesting stuff about how the brain works. Some I follow here just to try and understand the factions. I’m not hard into one side or the other. Comes with the culture where I grew up. I’m Substack-clueless; I’m here for the COVID info.

Twitter doesn’t lend itself to discussion. It lends itself to bumper-sticker brevity except for the long chains of tweets. Swipes, counter swipes, mostly, but sometimes people settle down and talk. Life isn’t Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or even Substack and YouTube. I wasn’t rabidly pro or rabidly against vaccines. I grew up in a house where people were relatively open-minded practical country folk, but there was a private liberal arts college in town.

Dad got his orientation to health from an uncle who was good at basic first aid and setting bones when people could not afford a doctor. Yes, that world existed. He got more information and know-how on medicines and vaccines as an Army corpsman in the Korean War. You have to be adaptable and heads-up. He made Staff sergeant in the brief enlistment time of that period, so he must have been a good organizer.

He was stationed in Fukuoka, Japan. There was a Japanese med school there. Some of the Japanese did ghastly experiments on POWS. One of the young med students wrote about it eventually. Fukuoka was about the closest port to Pusan, Korea. So there was a lot of traffic back and forth. At the end of WWII, a massive set of transfers took place between military units to get people grouped with others so that a whole unit could transfer back home at the end of their period of assignment. Marines moved out, Army shuffled and moved around. When you move around like that there is a lot of admin, including medical.

He did well enough in GI-bill med school that his teachers wanted him to specialize in Pathology. As I said, he opted to just go back to his little county seat and tend to people’s everyday health issues.

Do you know any (concientious, patient-centered, good-outcome-oriented, open-minded) doctors’ kids? Well, you’ve virtually met one.

My AC repairman remarked that I’m an anomaly. Maybe so. 🙂☕️🧸♥️⚓️

More than you wanted and maybe it didn’t say what you looked for.

My sister died last week. Gotta go finish getting her funeral memory board ready.

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Sorry about your sis. Thank you for the info. My father in law also was from the old school (not so greedy dr perhaps?). He served as an only dr, in charge of a small hospital and one of the biggest districts to cover with gravel road (used up 12 cars in the process which lasted 36 years!) Volvos. In a small town in south africa. He was not as affluent as the modern drs today and was also noy aiming to a high life style. One of our biggest problems today perhaps is their lifestyles got in the way of being honest in their work being real drs.

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Thanks you for the kind thoughts. ||

Some docs like the money. Money does give them the wherewithal to get a breath of fresh air and get away. We made do with weekend drives. Spot the first deer; get a milkshake. What’s this wildflower (hepatica). What’s a morel? Can I catch a good batch of crappie and bullhead today? My gastro brother-in-law is in a group practice and likes the money, but he is a very sharp gastro with a good heart who does research and is involved in the County and State level medical societies. Such docs still manage, e.g., Dr. Robert Dunworth https://www.dillow-taylor.com/view.php?r=3150 ||

Why is medicine so f*d up? How could docs be such ‘tools’ as to blithely participate in this vaccination process? ||

Dad’s challenges, over my lifetime, were the geometric rate of complication: acceleration of medical records paperwork; mandated non duplication of hospital services regardless of the organic shape of existing local hospitals; hyperspecialization of physicians into arcane areas that was supported by literally bussing clients from smaller communities to a central facility 40 minutes away; insurance and HMO proliferation; ever-varying drug formularies among the insurances and HMOs; ICD-coding; ‘required continuing education;’ public assistance paperwork; Medicare; Medicaid; computerization and networking that could be the norm in cities, but not in the hinterlands that were without reliable internet access; HIPPAA (a response to all the spreading-around of one’s private information); smartphone-based expectations for patient portals when smartphones and data connections were out of economic reach and computer savvy in the hinterlands and still are as remote school illustrated; the need for an office staff to manage phone traffic (I got my dad an answering machine at one point, but it just promptly filled up with unanswered messages because he really required a live body to triage phone traffic and after my mom died and I moved away his mistress couldn’t be bothered to answer the phones and do his bookkeeping as my mother had); malpractice insurance that forced some kind of specialization—because you as a general practitioner could no longer afford to insure yourself in OB/GYN & Internal medicine or family practice or emergency medicine& orthopedics; and the piece de resistance—electronic medical records. ||

Dr. Eric Topol thinks AI might help. I doubt it. AI might help as in the ‘expert systems’ of the 80s were envisioned to help—with diagnosis. But as I have outlined above, there are a lot of fast-changing moving parts, most of which complicated things rather than simplified them, and not all of the moving parts are text-based or well-interfaced such that they can just be cut over to an automated system.

I worked for CMS as a contractor in the division concerned with ensuring ‘surveyors’ could go out to facilities and assess compliance with regulations. Regulations often follow fuzzy or non-binary (as in yes/no) logic. Not easy. Another layer of complexity, in legalese. ||

This is probably not all a doc faces, because my dad died in 1989 and some of this is second-hand from my own patient/contractor experience and siblings’ experience (including the recently deceased sister who was on Medicaid and various forms of public assistance for several years after the 2008 recession until she died). ||

I deeply appreciate Kevin’s work and effort. I will do my best to stay among the living despite my shots (done while I was thoroughly distracted by my spouse’s non-COVID health struggles before and during COVID and while still trusting that medicine and government was for my welfare) and quietly and persistently help untangle this mess.

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Aaand…more complexity that I understand as of last night: not only was the GOF ban circumvented, but the usual FDA review does not apply because this was a military operation in more than logistics; apparently the shots were by military procurement from vendors under the EUA. This apparently permitted the bypassing of GMP/typical trials. The emergency is only partly lifted; the parts that enable EUA-style shots are still in effect and seemed to be in use for RSV & flu mRNA shots, as well as for ‘seasonal’ COVID shots.

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Jun 5, 2023Liked by Anandamide

Thank you Kevin. What a web of lies they have fabricated in the pursuit of dollars. Peace.

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Jun 5, 2023·edited Jun 5, 2023

as the interviewer in the video notes .gov is not after making a buck

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So.... what is anyone's guess on what may be knock on effects if you eat meat thusly abused?

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"The number of LNPs per shot is reported to be 10-50 billion. For easy math, lets assume 40 billion LNPs. " Can you please provide the link for the study that got this number, or the page of the people who wrote it?

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Magnificent. Thank you for this. 🙏

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MEASURE? Vax vs. Infection?

Does anyone know of "vaccine only" indicating (multi-variant) PCR tests or aptamers binding specifically to vaccine spike / mRNA / plasmides / RT'd DNA only?

As I'm curious, I would like to know how to measure infection vs. vaccination load on the cells of e.g. a biopsy sample or some blood sample. One could normalize on some DNA of the cells to have comparable values independant of sample size or technique (swabbing pressure...) it was taken.

(And of course, this is mandatory for any coroner doing histology. Imho.

So how to produce such aptamers and bind them to color molecules eg for RTLAMP ?

As long as we can not measure, we can not proof harm.

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Okay, the reauthentication is getting tedious. Let’s just do logins or something.

Anyway the article is deep but I could follow the better part of it. Much is coming out about oncogenic material in the jabs and they work long term unless you’ve already had cancer in which case it comes back in a blink and at Stage 4. From what I’ve seen doctors are NOT following up. PSA readings are overlooked, other lab results are dismissed. Lots of blood/marrow cancer going undetected. Gates said we’d know in 2 years how “successful “ it was. That link to the neuron growth involving graphene oxide and gold was a jaw dropper. A friend of mine, double vaxxed and boosted and flu shot, is reporting glial invasion in his eye but he says it’s a rare condition. Indeed.

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Is the Bhakdi video somewhere else besides Rumble? Can't watch it here in France.

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Can you perhaps use a VPN and reset your location to the US, then retry? Some in the Ravelry online community used to do this to be able to access museum videos.

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Thanks, will try this.

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With the greatest respect for your work and your specialist knowledge, I am very interested in what you can say about this article?

https://open.substack.com/pub/anamihalceamdphd/p/hydrogel-and-graphene-oxide-used?r=1pk0jl&utm_medium=ios&utm_campaign=post

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I commented up top but thanks for this link- ungodly for sure. The only thing that’s a bit curious is that the covid test kits were suspected of ferrying prion disease to the brain and the vaxxes themselves seemed to indicate they could do it as well. Why would you want more and longer neurons if you’re triggering apoptosis? I suppose different vials will have different results. Most of us suspect 5G and higher will be key. Thanks again.

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